Friday, 28 October 2011 17:32

Oil from Stars

The fossil fuels theory, currently en vogue in the Western world, has been long abandoned by Russian scientists (very long ago, even during the late Soviet times). However, scientists in the USA stubbornly and wrongly kept believing that crude oil comes from  cadaver piles of dead dinosaurs and huge leafs of ferns. 

Complex organics formed by natural nuclear reactions inside stars!

The new study has concluded its results in the journal Nature couple days ago. At the University of Hong Kong, a team of researchers, led by Sun Kwok, discovered star ejected matter in deep space which resembles in composition the complex chemical constructs of petroleum and coal. Carbohydrates are not byproducts of living organisms' decay, but -as this new scientific study indicates- organic compounds are continuously created in space, in the perfect absence of life forms.

For one, the good news is that crude oil reserves are not "that limited" as the fossil fuel false theory suggested. This new study confirming that stars generate carbohydrates-similar compounds is backed by a bit older discoveries of the methane lakes on the moon Titan where clouds of methane and ethane float in a nitrogen dominant atmosphere.   

We wrote about the abiotic origin of oil on our planet earlier on crude-oil-prices.net in an article titled "The Entire World Has 500 Years of Crude Oil Supplies."

On a side note, this new discovery indicates that finding life anywhere in the Universe is not anymore a sci-fi fantasy feat.

"In the astronomy community, it has been commonly assumed that the UIE features are emitted by [polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, or PAH] molecules, which are simple, purely aromatic, molecules made of carbon and hydrogen," Kwok said. "Our paper suggests that the PAH hypothesis is not correct." [Spectacular Photos of Nebulas in Deep Space]
 

 "I have been suspecting this for many years," Kwok said. "Now we think we have the evidence."

Source:  Discovery: Cosmic Dust Contains Organic Matter from Stars --  space.com