Today in Energy

Short, timely articles with graphics on energy facts, issues, and trends.
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  1. U.S. biodiesel production still increasing despite expiration of tax credit
    Through the first nine months of 2017, U.S. biodiesel production levels were slightly higher than 2016 levels, despite the expiration of a federal biodiesel blender's tax credit at the end of 2016. Domestic biodiesel production may continue to increase because of changes to import policies such as those recently announced by the U.S. Department of Commerce on biodiesel imports from Argentina and Indonesia.
  2. Production from offshore pre-salt oil deposits has increased Brazil's oil production
    Brazil has produced 3.3 million barrels per day (b/d) of petroleum and other liquids so far in 2017, according to data through August, up from 3.2 million b/d in 2016, making it the ninth-largest producer of petroleum and other liquids in the world. Production of crude oil in Brazil increased in recent years as producers targeted large, offshore, pre-salt oil deposits.
  3. Utility solar photovoltaic capacity is dominated by crystalline silicon panel technology
    Most of the growing number of installations of utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) operating capacity across the United States have been systems that make use of crystalline silicon panels. In 2016, 70% of U.S. utility-scale PV capacity used crystalline silicon modules. Thin-film technology accounted for 28% of capacity.
  4. Refined coal has made up nearly one-fifth of coal-fired power generation so far in 2017
    The U.S. power sector consumption of coal is increasingly shifting to refined coal, even as coal-fired electricity generation decreases. Use of refined coal has increased from 17% of power sector coal consumption in 2016 to 19% so far in 2017, based on data through September
  5. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions decreased in most states from 2005 to 2015
    The United States has a diverse energy landscape that is reflected in differences in state-level emissions profiles. Between 2005 and 2015, energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions decreased in 43 states (including the District of Columbia) and increased in 8 states.