Today in Energy

Short, timely articles with graphics on energy facts, issues, and trends.
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  1. Gasoline prices ahead of Memorial Day are higher than 2016, but second lowest since 2009
    Gasoline prices heading into Memorial Day weekend average $2.40 per gallon (gal) nationally, up from last year's price of $2.30/gal. Despite the year-over-year increase, 2017 marks the second-lowest price ahead of the Memorial Day weekend since 2009, when the national average price of retail regular gasoline was $2.31/gal.
  2. Energy storage and renewables beyond wind, hydro, solar make up 4% of U.S. power capacity
    Beyond the main sources of electricity generation capacity in the United States that have recently been discussed in a series of Today in Energy articles, additional amounts of utility-scale capacity are provided by technologies such as hydroelectric pumped storage, batteries, flywheels, and renewable fuels other than hydro, wind, and solar.
  3. Crossover utility vehicles blur distinction between passenger cars and light trucks
    Light-duty vehicles are generally classified into two groups: passenger cars and light trucks. However, crossover utility vehicles (CUVs) which appear similar to sport utility vehicles but share design attributes with passenger cars�are blurring the distinction between the two classifications.
  4. Fuel economy improvements are projected to reduce future gasoline use
    Anticipated changes in energy consumption by light-duty vehicles in the United States are based on two factors: the amount of travel and the fuel economy of the vehicles used. The Annual Energy Outlook 2017 (AEO2017) Reference case projects a decline in light-duty vehicle energy use between 2018 and 2040 as improvements in fuel economy more than offset increases in light-duty vehicle miles.
  5. Air conditioning and other appliances increase residential electricity use in the summer
    Residential electricity consumption rises and falls seasonally substantially more than commercial or industrial consumption, largely because of air conditioning use in the summer. According to the most recent data from EIA�s Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), nearly 9 out of 10 U.S. homes are air conditioned by central units, individual (window, wall, or portable) units, or both.